Our performance

vascular surgery

We know having prompt access to NHS treatment and care is extremely important to patients, as waiting for treatment, an operation or test results can be a particularly anxious time.

Staff worked continuously hard throughout the year and achieved most of our key performance targets for 2013/2014.

We also continue to see and treat more patients than ever before. In the last financial year:

  • We saw 86,282 emergency admissions
  • Our inpatient (and day case) activity went up to 186,172 in our acute hospitals (James Cook and the Friarage) and we also saw 2,142 inpatients and day cases in our community hospitals
  • A staggering 125,873 patients came through our accident and emergency departments at James Cook and the Friarage
  • A further 26,757 went to our urgent care centres and 41,475 patients visited the Resolution walk-in centre
  • We had 486,091 outpatient attendances (new and review)

The trust’s overall performance rating is made up of a number of performance indicators, which show how an organisation is doing in relation to some of the targets set by the Government for the NHS, as well as other broader measures of performance.

Our most recent published figures for September 2014 are below.

What does this mean for patients?

  • Infection control. Clostridium difficile infections – we’ve been set a very challenging national target this year to have no more than 49 cases among inpatients aged over two years, excluding patients where the first positive sample was submitted within two days of admission to hospital (To-date we’ve had 24 cases)
  • Everyone with suspected cancer has to be seen for their first consultant appointment within two weeks of a GP referring them – 94.7% (predicted position)
  • There should be a maximum waiting time of up to a month (31 days) from diagnosis to the first definitive treatment for all cancers – 98.2% (predicted position)
  • There should be a maximum waiting time of up to a month (31 days) for subsequent drug (chemotherapy) treatments for all cancers – 100% (predicted position)
  • There should be a maximum waiting time position of up to a month (31 days) for subsequent surgery treatments for all cancers – 98.6% (predicted position)
  • There should be a maximum waiting time position of up to a month (31 days) for subsequent radiotherapy treatments for all cancers – 96.7% (predicted position)
  • There should be a maximum waiting time of two months (62 days) from an urgent GP referral to first treatment for all cancers – 78% (predicted position)
  • There should be a maximum waiting time of two months for treatment of all cancers referred from a national screening service -100%
  • Admitted pathways – percentage referral to treatment waiting times within 18 weeks – 94.5% (target 90%)
  • Non-admitted pathways – percentage referral to treatment waiting times within 18 weeks – 98.1%
  • Maximum waiting time of four hours in accident and emergency from arrival to admission, transfer or discharge – 94.8% (Accident and emergency continues to be really busy with huge demand for services)

Referral to treatment times

If your GP refers you for treatment, you should start your consultant-led treatment within a maximum of 18 weeks from referral for non-urgent conditions and to be seen by a cancer specialist within a maximum of two weeks from GP referral for urgent referrals where cancer is suspected. If this is not possible, the NHS has to take all reasonable steps to offer you a range of alternatives.